Hollow Tomato Varieties: Growing Schimmeig Striped Stuffing Tomato Plants

Tomatoes are easy to grow in the summer garden, and the Schmmeig Striped Hollow is a
must have for those looking for something a bit more curious. Similar to other hollow tomatoes, these may be shaped more like a bell pepper. Imagine the
looks on your family’s faces when they get a taste of this scrumptious fruit.
Read on to learn more about it.

About Schimmeig Striped Hollow Tomatoes

Another of the wonderful stuffing tomatoes, Schimmeig
tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum ‘Schimmeig
Stoo’) are an open-pollinated German heirloom. Also known as Striped Cavern, of
which ‘schimmeig stoo’ translates to in Manx Gaelic, this tomato plant features
orange stripes on a red, bicolored fruit.

With sturdy walls and hollow spaces inside, they’re great
for stuffing with a tasty chicken salad or other mix. Not widely known yet
among most gardeners, many chefs have learned of the hollow tomato varieties
and use them for unusual presentations in fine dining restaurants.

Also a type of paste tomato, growing a Schimmeig stuffing tomato results in plenty of fruit for sauces, canning, and fresh-eating without lots of juice. Tomatoes may also be frozen. Many have low acidity. Each fruit weighs about six ounces (170 g.).

Growing a Schimmeig Stuffing Tomato

Start tomato seeds inside a few weeks before your soil warms to 75 degrees F. (24 C.). Plant seeds half an inch (1 cm.) deep and keep the soil moist until germination occurs. Locate seeds in a warm area without direct sunlight until they’ve sprouted. You may cover with plastic to keep moisture in. Don’t let the soil get too wet, though, as seeds will rot.

Put sprouted seeds into partial sunlight, gradually adjusting them to more sun every few days. Turn containers as seedlings begin to reach for the light. If using an indoor light, locate seedlings about 6 inches (15 cm.) underneath.

When the soil has warmed and seedlings have four or more true leaves, you may transplant them into a full sun spot in your landscape. Allow 3 feet (1 m.) between plants so they get proper airflow. Since you may be using them as edible bowls, you’ll want to avoid blemishes on the skin.

Caring for Schimmeig Tomatoes

A consistent watering schedule also helps avoid them. Water at the same time each day,
using the same amount of water to keep Schimmeig striped hollow tomatoes
disease and blemish free. Fertilize the tomato plants with your choice of food regularly after watering.

A late-season, indeterminate type, these plants need good
support. Use a heavy cage or sturdy trellis. You may prune these plants to
remove top growth and weak branches and later to remove dying and diseased
stems. This can encourage your plant to produce longer.

Keep an eye out for pests throughout the season as well.

One final tip for growing hollow tomato varieties like the Schimmeig…most are vigorous and produce many tomatoes. Pinch out part of the blooms to redirect energy to growing fruits, making them bigger. You might get 8 to 10 ounce (227-284 g.) tomatoes by doing this. Fruits reach maturity in about 80 days.

This article was last updated on 10/22/21
Read more about Tomatoes

Tomatoes are easy to grow in the summer garden, and the Schmmeig Striped Hollow is a
must have for those looking for something a bit more curious. Similar to other hollow tomatoes, these may be shaped more like a bell pepper. Imagine the
looks on your family’s faces when they get a taste of this scrumptious fruit.
Read on to learn more about it.

About Schimmeig Striped Hollow Tomatoes

Another of the wonderful stuffing tomatoes, Schimmeig
tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum ‘Schimmeig
Stoo’) are an open-pollinated German heirloom. Also known as Striped Cavern, of
which ‘schimmeig stoo’ translates to in Manx Gaelic, this tomato plant features
orange stripes on a red, bicolored fruit.

With sturdy walls and hollow spaces inside, they’re great
for stuffing with a tasty chicken salad or other mix. Not widely known yet
among most gardeners, many chefs have learned of the hollow tomato varieties
and use them for unusual presentations in fine dining restaurants.

Also a type of paste tomato, growing a Schimmeig stuffing tomato results in plenty of fruit for sauces, canning, and fresh-eating without lots of juice. Tomatoes may also be frozen. Many have low acidity. Each fruit weighs about six ounces (170 g.).

Growing a Schimmeig Stuffing Tomato

Start tomato seeds inside a few weeks before your soil warms to 75 degrees F. (24 C.). Plant seeds half an inch (1 cm.) deep and keep the soil moist until germination occurs. Locate seeds in a warm area without direct sunlight until they’ve sprouted. You may cover with plastic to keep moisture in. Don’t let the soil get too wet, though, as seeds will rot.

Put sprouted seeds into partial sunlight, gradually adjusting them to more sun every few days. Turn containers as seedlings begin to reach for the light. If using an indoor light, locate seedlings about 6 inches (15 cm.) underneath.

When the soil has warmed and seedlings have four or more true leaves, you may transplant them into a full sun spot in your landscape. Allow 3 feet (1 m.) between plants so they get proper airflow. Since you may be using them as edible bowls, you’ll want to avoid blemishes on the skin.

Caring for Schimmeig Tomatoes

A consistent watering schedule also helps avoid them. Water at the same time each day,
using the same amount of water to keep Schimmeig striped hollow tomatoes
disease and blemish free. Fertilize the tomato plants with your choice of food regularly after watering.

A late-season, indeterminate type, these plants need good
support. Use a heavy cage or sturdy trellis. You may prune these plants to
remove top growth and weak branches and later to remove dying and diseased
stems. This can encourage your plant to produce longer.

Keep an eye out for pests throughout the season as well.

One final tip for growing hollow tomato varieties like the Schimmeig…most are vigorous and produce many tomatoes. Pinch out part of the blooms to redirect energy to growing fruits, making them bigger. You might get 8 to 10 ounce (227-284 g.) tomatoes by doing this. Fruits reach maturity in about 80 days.

This article was last updated on 10/22/21
Read more about Tomatoes
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