Week’s or Weeks’ | Which is Correct? Difference Between Week’s or Weeks’ With Examples

Week’s or weeks’: Week’s or weeks’. Which is correct? Actually, both are correct but are used in different contexts. The apostrophe has different functions in the English language. The word “week’s” demonstrates anything related to that week. It is a singular form of noun week. But the word weeks’ is itself a plural form and an additional apostrophe is to form the possessive.

Weeks is utilized for the plural of the week. Week’s and Weeks’ are utilized in compound time articulations. Week’s is utilized with a solitary time unit and weeks’ is utilized for a plural unit.

In this article, we will go through both the words “Week’”s and “weeks’” closely. Also to understand better we will go some examples that use both words. The rules applied to use both words are discussed here.

Week’s or Weeks’? Which is Correct?

Once more, both “week’s” and “weeks’” are right, and you can utilize possibly one, yet in various settings. The decision of which word to utilize will rely upon whether you’re utilizing the solitary or plural possessive type of “week.”

“Week’s” is the solitary possessive type of the thing “week,” and, for this situation, we utilize the punctuation – s to show that something has a place with a specific week being referred to.

“Weeks” is the plural type of the thing, and it alludes to a few successive weeks. As the plural structure “weeks” as of now finishes in – s, all we need to do to shape the possessive of this plural thing is to add punctuation to its furthest limit. Adding another – s, for this situation, isn’t required.

Consequently, “weeks’” is the right possessive type of the plural “weeks,” showing that something has a place with a bunch of successive weeks.

Week’s or Weeks’ Examples

Uses of Week’s and Weeks’ with examples are listed here.

Examples of Week’s Examples of Weeks’
He is given one week’s notice He is given two weeks’ notice
John was given one week’s free insurance Johny was given four weeks’ free insurance
Megha is going away in one week’s time. Megha is going away in two weeks’ time.
Meera was docked one week’s pay. Meera was docked two weeks’ pay.

 

From the above examples we can see, the word “week’s” is used as a singular word whereas the word “weeks’” is used as a plural word. Thus, the context of both words is different.

week's or weeks'

Week’s and Weeks’

The meaning of week is the days that start from Monday to Sunday in UK or Sunday to Saturday in the US.

In any case, “week” comprises any pattern of seven successive days or days that follow each other. In this way, you can allude to “seven days” on any day between Sunday and Saturday, and in that way mean seven days from that day forward.

Regardless of whether you say “week from today” or “in week’s time,” everything has a similar significance. Everything alludes to “week” inside a seven-day cycle that can begin anytime, and it generally implies multi-week, or seven days, from that day forward.

Keep in mind, “week” is a solitary thing and “weeks” is the plural type of a similar word. Consequently, “weeks” will allude to a time frame of no less than 14 days or fourteen days. In any case, it can likewise mean numerous weeks.

Furthermore, “weeks” doesn’t generally need to allude to sequential weeks however can likewise allude to a particular timeframe or an endless timeframe.

Now and again, a plural possessive thing will require the expansion of a punctuation – s. We for the most part utilize this structure for plural things that don’t as of now end in – s. As “weeks” is plural and as of now finishes in – s, it just requires punctuation toward the end to make it possessive.

FAQ’s on Week’s or Weeks’

Question 1.

Which is the correct word, “weeks” or “week’s”?

Answer:

Weeks is used as plural form or week. Whereas “week’s” is used as a singular form.

Question 2.

When do you put an apostrophe in weeks?

Answer:

If it is one measure of time then apostrophe is used before ‘s’, such as “week’s”. If it is more than one measure of time then apostrophe is used after ‘s’, such as weeks’.

Question 3.

It should be a week’s notice or a “weeks’” notice?

Answer:

It should be “a week’s notice”.

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